Urban Design
Urban Morphology
Computation & Generative Design
visualizingmath:

geometrymatters:

Geometry Matters:
Various nature elements that abide by geometric laws and construction patterns.
© Geometrymatters,2014

Reblogged for the Visualizing Math followers that are fans of Sacred Geometry.

visualizingmath:

geometrymatters:

Geometry Matters:

Various nature elements that abide by geometric laws and construction patterns.

© Geometrymatters,2014

Reblogged for the Visualizing Math followers that are fans of Sacred Geometry.

sailingismore:

Eladio Dieste - Atlantida Church 1952 Atlántida, Uruguay

fabriciomora:

Metacenter, the emergence of a garden territory - ATELIER CHUCK

fabriciomora:

Rotating plug-in apartment in Shanghai - Bojing Qu

likeafieldmouse:

Cha Jong-Rye - Expose Exposed (2010)

workman:

nuuro:
Eugene Von Bruenchenhein Oct 12 1965 - drawings found in wallpaper sample book.

workman:

nuuro:

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein Oct 12 1965 - drawings found in wallpaper sample book.

fabriciomora:

P.F.A.F.F: PRESERVE FABLE (ABOUT) ARCHITECTURE FACTORY FACILITIES - Studio Animal

fabriciomora:

Las Uniones en Bambú

bryanmaddock:

The diagram is not only an explanation, as something that comes after, but it also acts as an intermediary in the process of generation of real space and time. As a generator there is not necessarily a one-to-one correspondence between the diagram and the resultant form. There are many instances, for example in Le Corbusier’s Modulor where the diagram is invisible in the building, yet it reappears as a repetitive element that occurs at many different scales, repeated in little segments of houses to large segments of urban plans, yet it is rarely an explicit form. Thus Le Corbusier’s statement that the plan is the generator will be seen to be different from the diagram as the generator. 

Diagram: An Original Scene of Writing, Diagram Diaries [Peter Eisenman / 1999]

bryanmaddock:

The diagram is not only an explanation, as something that comes after, but it also acts as an intermediary in the process of generation of real space and time. As a generator there is not necessarily a one-to-one correspondence between the diagram and the resultant form. There are many instances, for example in Le Corbusier’s Modulor where the diagram is invisible in the building, yet it reappears as a repetitive element that occurs at many different scales, repeated in little segments of houses to large segments of urban plans, yet it is rarely an explicit form. Thus Le Corbusier’s statement that the plan is the generator will be seen to be different from the diagram as the generator. 

Diagram: An Original Scene of Writing, Diagram Diaries [Peter Eisenman / 1999]